Pep Talk #1: Procrastinate

I am a notorious procrastinator.  It is a sign of my intelligence, or at least that is what I’ve decided to believe.  I don’t even know if anyone knows I’m notorious, which I guess is the definition of notoriety.  Maybe I’m not well known for it.  But I do it.  You do, too.

So let’s get it out of the way, then, shall we?  Maybe a quick run-down of procrastination habits will help get it out of the way and we can return to being productive.  Of course, there is social media.  If I don’t like, share, and comment on at least a dozen posts several times a day, people will think I’m dead.  And then of course, I must overshare how my day is going, what my kid did, the picture of the food I created, maybe some pictures of my family at their absolute best.  I probably need to read a book, some articles, and watch some TV before I do any work.  I am so multi-talented, I should probably find time to practice guitar, and you know what, I have a regular job I should probably be getting to, so all that procrastination has led to zero productivity.

I have no time.  This is one of the biggest reasons we never get started on the dream project.  If you’re like me, you think of time in hour increments.  If I don’t have a spare hour, I don’t even think about getting to the gym, sitting down to write, or anything else on my coulda-shoulda-woulda list.  But I think if we can get comfortable with 5 minute increments, we can get in the habit of taking advantage of those discrete intervals and setting mini-goals that are attainable in that time frame.

A goal or purpose should consume you and fill your mind with a determination.   I think in many cases, this purpose must be manufactured and built slowly, like a setting a fire in a rain forest.  It can be done, but you have to be meticulous and intentional about building the right environment for success to thrive.

BHAG.  Our BNI area director, James Barber, talks about having a Big Hairy Audacious Goal (BHAG).  And I’m going to borrow that term and call it my Sasquatch (Scary Audacious Super Quest Universe at the Crap Handler…okay I’m still working on my acronym).  Maybe yeti would be shorter.  I’m trying to think of something big and hairy to tie to the BHAG.  But anyway, you have to come up with something larger than life, something that requires a naivete or foolishness, a confidence, to say that you’re going to do.  It’s not bragging, because you haven’t done it yet, but if you say it and you can continue to say it until it consumes your every thought and continues to daily motivate you to make progress toward that goal, then that is what matters.

It’s not enough to say what you want, you have to say what you are, what you will accomplish.  There can be no doubt in the statement.  You must say it loud and proud.

“I am going to be an international bestselling fantasy and scifi writer whose books change hearts and minds through the clever humor and mystery contained therein.”

There you go.  Let’s do this!

Or…maybe it can wait…

Remember This…If You Can.

I watched a Ted Talk on memory a few months back and it has embedded itself, working through my subconscious mind until now.  Joshua Foer is an independent journalist who became interested in writing about a group of people who participated in the US Memory Championships.  He became so infatuated with the topic that he trained himself in the techniques and won the Championship himself in 2006.

If you are a fan of the BBC production, Sherlock, then you may be familiar with the Mind Palace, a memorization technique.  The idea of the Mind Palace has been around since the early Greek philosophers as a concept called the Method of Loci (no, not the Norse trickster god).  It is essentially associating something you want to remember with a place or an image.  To remember multiple things you build a Memory Palace or a house with things in it that you then associate with what you want to remember.

Alex Mullen has recently surpassed Foer’s accomplishments to be the 2-time and current US Memory Champ.  He runs a non-profit that works to disseminate and encourage these types of techniques.  On his website, one of his intro videos shows you how to memorize a list of 20-words.  He does so by walking around his house and inside and associates each word with a different item, and gives a description of the image that he would picture.

I am just at the tip of the iceberg on memory training.  His initial video seemed unnecessarily complicated, but he’s the memory champ, not me.  I took the same list and told a story-kind of like my dreams go where I make a decision and am in a completely different environment, almost like a Rube Goldberg device where one seemingly unrelated thing leads to the next.  Telling the story of those words in a visual way, once I had composed the story (maybe 5 minutes), I was able to fully recall all 20 words.  Amazingly, an hour later, after unrelated work, starting the story, I was able to recall the 20 words again.

I have a lot to learn about memorization, but in a remarkably short time I was able to memorize something fairly random that I had no real reason to memorize other than for the novelty of it.